WALTER TRIER / LILLIPUT – The Pocket Magazine for Everyone

032c Workshop / Joerg Koch is pleased to present UDO KITTELMANN’s personal collection of Lilliput, the antifascist pocket magazine for everyone.

032c2

Lilliput was a British monthly magazine of art, photography, humor, and fiction founded in 1937 by the filmmaker and photojournalist Stefan Lorant, who had served time in Nazi prison before emigrating to England. Until 1949, each cover was illustrated by WALTER TRIER (1890–1951), a German-Jewish antifascist exiled in Britain and one of the greatest illustrators of the Weimar Republic. Trier gained worldwide recognition for illustrating the children’s books of Erich Kästner, including Emil and the Detectives (1929). After the war, Trier moved to Canada, where Walt Disney offered him a job as an animator, but Trier declined because he didn’t want to work within a corporate framework. Each of Trier’s covers for Lilliput features the fictional couple Frau Lena and Herr Walter as well as their Scottish terrier dog, Zottel, who together engaged in activities such as peeling potatoes, sunbathing, or working in a munitions factory. Historical periods are varied and the mood of each cover is lively yet carries a veiled menace.

032c7Lilliput is named after the fictional island nation in Jonathan Swift’s 1726 political satire Gulliver’s Travels. Inhabited by people who are 1/12 the size of human beings, Lilliput the island and its internal politics parody those of Great Britain in the 18th century, “belittling” yet deliberating on the central issues of the time. Lilliput the magazine was a small but fierce publication that preserved British morale during the Second World War, and like Swift’s satire, its politics were disguised in cheer. “We believe that a paper such as Lilliput can help to win the war!” wrote Lorant in the September 1940 editorial. The publication was literate, but not literary, and featured articles by other German-Jewish exiles including Lion Feuchtwanger, Ernst Toller, and Arnold Zweig, as well as international writers such as Upton Sinclair and AJ Cronin. It also included photography by Erwin Blumenfeld, Bill Brandt, Brassaï, and John Heartfield. At the heart of each issue was Lilliput’s “doubles” feature, which juxtaposed two unrelated images suddenly cast into wholly new relationships. This surrealist method – although customary today – was a powerful gesture for a general-interest publication in the 1930s and 40s, suggesting a phantom science of the image and its unknown potential.

WALTER TRIER / LILLIPUT – The Pocket Magazine for Everybody opens February 20 and is on view until March 27, 2014.

Works:

• 142 Lilliput magazines, 1937–1949
• Jonathan Swift (1667–1745), Gulliver’s Reisen in unbekannte Länder, Stuttgart, 1848
• Walter Bosse (1904–1979), Dog, Kufstein, Austria, 1930s
• Popeye & Olive, United States, 1940s–50s
• Library staircase maquette, 20th century
• Bucket, moulds, and sand, 21st century

IMG_0109-2

032c Workshop / Joerg Koch is an exhibition space in Berlin. Featuring an eight-meter-long vitrine designed by Konstantin Grcic, its programming includes several exhibition series, exploring the idea of the archive, the auteur, or the unseen.

Deeper

  • Thus Spoke Bischofberger: Artforum’s Eternally Swiss Back Cover

    An advertisement for the art gallery belonging to dealer and collector Bruno Bischofberger has occupied the back cover of every issue of Artforum since April 1987. Seen out of context and en masse, the eternally Swiss contents of these promotions at first appear idiosyncratic; upon further scrutiny, however, they seem insane.More
  • Apparel

    032c “Dark Times” Brecht T-Shirt Black

    €50
    Buy Now
  • Société de 032c: GLOBAL PREDICTIONS from Cyber Oracle SITA ABELLAN

    “The major debate everyone is avoiding is how technology will modify our society and economy,” says the model, DJ, and self-proclaimed “techno princess” in a series of dystopian prophecies. “Technology is forging our behavior and will deeply affect who we become as human beings. Avoiding discussions about the use of technology without limitations and restraints will cause major injustices.”More
  • 032c WWB Collection

    032c WWB Turtleneck Camouflage

    €80
    Buy Now
  • Apparel

    032c Classics Logo Beanie

    €40
    Buy Now
  • Salty, Litigious, Iconoclastic: DAVID SIMON on TV as discourse

    With “The Wire,” DAVID SIMON accomplished the unlikely feat of captivating both West ­Baltimore bruisers and The New Yorker subscribers for an hour a week, over the course of six years. Twenty years into television’s latest “Golden Age,” as the creative blueprint pioneered by Simon and shows like The Sopranos unfurls into an endless stream of content from Amazon and Netflix, we revisit our 2011 interview with Simon from 032c Issue 20.More
  • OG? OK! Onitsuka Tiger Unveils 70th Anniversary OK Basketball Shoes in Berlin

    At their store on Alte Schönhauserstrasse in Berlin, Japanese footwear mainstays Onitsuka Tiger held a Japan-themed mini festival to herald the arrival of the OK Basketball MT and the OK Basketball Lo: two new shoes inspired by the groundbreaking design that ignited the Onitsuka Tiger brand almost 70 years ago.More
  • CROSS-DRESSING IN THE WEHRMACHT: Unseen Practices at the German Front

    While collecting amateur photography from periods during and after the war, Berlin-based visual artist Martin Dammann would, “from time to time,” stumble upon photographs of cross-dressing soldiers. Provoked, he began to seek out more, drawn to the “kaleidoscope of emotional states” that they revealed: “Desire for women. Desire for men. To be a woman. To be elsewhere. To be someone else.” More
  • THE BIG FLAT NOW: Power, Flatness, and Nowness in the Third Millennium

    As a contemporary metaphor, flatness describes how the invention of the Internet has restructured global society. At its origin, its promise was a social revolution founded on intersectional equality and universal democracy. It is our contention that that promise may yet be fully realized.More