WALTER TRIER / LILLIPUT – The Pocket Magazine for Everyone

IMG_0020-2-web2

032c Workshop / Joerg Koch is pleased to present UDO KITTELMANN’s personal collection of LILLIPUT, the antifascist pocket magazine for everyone.

Lilliput was a British monthly magazine of art, photography, humor, and fiction founded in 1937 by the filmmaker and photojournalist Stefan Lorant, who had served time in Nazi prison before emigrating to England. Until 1949, each cover was illustrated by Walter Trier (1890–1951), a German-Jewish antifascist exiled in Britain and one of the greatest illustrators of the Weimar Republic. Trier gained worldwide recognition for illustrating the children’s books of Erich Kästner, including Emil and the Detectives (1929). After the war, Trier moved to Canada, where Walt Disney offered him a job as an animator, but Trier declined because he didn’t want to work within a corporate framework. Each of Trier’s covers for Lilliput features the fictional couple Frau Lena and Herr Walter as well as their Scottish terrier dog, Zottel, who together engaged in activities such as peeling potatoes, sunbathing, or working in a munitions factory. Historical periods are varied and the mood of each cover is lively yet carries a veiled menace.

IMG_0030-2

Lilliput is named after the fictional island nation in Jonathan Swift’s 1726 political satire Gulliver’s Travels. Inhabited by people who are 1/12 the size of human beings, Lilliput the island and its internal politics parody those of Great Britain in the 18th century, “belittling” yet deliberating on the central issues of the time. Lilliput the magazine was a small but fierce publication that preserved British morale during the Second World War, and like Swift’s satire, its politics were disguised in cheer. “We believe that a paper such as Lilliput can help to win the war!” wrote Lorant in the September 1940 editorial. The publication was literate, but not literary, and featured articles by other German-Jewish exiles including Lion Feuchtwanger, Ernst Toller, and Arnold Zweig, as well as international writers such as Upton Sinclair and AJ Cronin. It also included photography by Erwin Blumenfeld, Bill Brandt, Brassaï, and John Heartfield. At the heart of each issue was Lilliput’s “doubles” feature, which juxtaposed two unrelated images suddenly cast into wholly new relationships. This surrealist method—although customary today—was a powerful gesture for a general-interest publication in the 1930s and 40s, suggesting a phantom science of the image and its unknown potential.

WALTER TRIER / LILLIPUT – The Antifascist Pocket Magazine for Everyone opens on February 20 and is on view until March 27, 2014.

032c Workhop / Joerg Koch
Brunnenstraße 19
10119 Berlin

Deeper

  • ALL A DAT ALL A DAT: Rap Crew 67 Can Make Anything

    Members ASAP, Monkey, LD, Dimzy, Liquez, and SJ are branching out. “67 can release rizla,” says LD ahead of the UK drill collective’s appearance this weekend in Berlin. “Not everybody can do that. A lot of people are just rappers.”More
  • 032c Resist Collection

    032c Resist Pin

    €10
  • David Ostrowski Brings Bauhaus to Warsaw’s Galeria Wschód

    The painter David Ostrowski has been off the radar for the last few years. A former student of Albert Oehlen and graduate of the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, Ostrowski is best known for his large abstract paintings, which often include the use of spray cans and a formalistic approach to shape. Now he's back, with a new body of work and two shows – the first of which opens in Warsaw at the progressive gallery space Wschód this weekend.More
  • 032c WWB Collection

    032c WWB Rugby Shirt Black

    €115
    Buy Now
  • Anders Haal and Nicole Walker Imagine Total Fluidity on Humanity’s Next Planet

    The late Stephen Hawking was convinced that humanity's time on Earth was coming to a close, and proposed Proxima Centauri b as a second planetary home. The transition off-world is one subject in a new fashion book by stylist Nicole Walker and Anders Haal, founder of Stockholm-based fashion label HAAL, that considers the illogic of borders on a cosmic scale. Here we preview the book's opening visual essay.More