Société de 032c: Artist Ketuta Alexi-Meskhishvili on Brazlian Novelist Clarice Lispector

Half a decade ago, Muriel Rukeyser wondered, “What would happen if one woman told the truth about her life?” She concluded, “The world would split open.”

Standing barefoot on baby-pink carpeting, Ketuta Alexi-Meskhishvili contains such earth-shattering powers. The Tbilisi-born New Yorker and Berlin-based artist – and former Jean Paul Gaultier muse! – is complexity incarnate. Her most recent obsession with novelist Clarice Lispector is rooted precisely in the Brazilian writer’s world-encompassing multiplicity: “She wrote through immigration, kids, family, death, divorce – nothing could stop her. And her writing is a first record of its kind, where a woman wrote from early youth through old age and was never interrupted.”

Lispector’s final, unfinished work A Breath of Life is a dialogue between a nameless author and Angela, the character they invented. Creator and creation bleed into one another in very real and definitely inescapable codependency.

Alexi-Meskhishvili’s literary obsession is eerily attuned to her partner Andro Wekua’s lifeless yet undead mannequin sculpture. A Breath of Life’s descriptions of splits, pain, scarring, and ever-morphing modes of perception perfectly match the internal monologue one could imagine playing out in the sculpture’s mind.

Wekua’s powered-down cyborg graced the pages of 032c last year and is currently on display as part of his solo exhibition at the Kölnischer Kunstverein. Pictured here during its opening, Alexi-Meskhishvili spent a good deal of time in Cologne for her own solo presentation at the Kunstverein last year. For those visiting the city, Alexi-Meskhishvili raves about Peter Zumthor’s reading room at the Kolumba museum, which “with its gray silk ombré curtains, feels like the womb.” Perhaps as a remedy to her insomnia – fostered by travel, a never clearing work schedule, and motherhood – she also strongly endorses Koelsch, “which is not a place, but it is the best drink ever invented.”

This article was taken from 032c Issue #30: “NO FEAR.” It’s available now. 


Deeper

  • Thus Spoke Bischofberger: Artforum’s Eternally Swiss Back Cover

    An advertisement for the art gallery belonging to dealer and collector Bruno Bischofberger has occupied the back cover of every issue of Artforum since April 1987. Seen out of context and en masse, the eternally Swiss contents of these promotions at first appear idiosyncratic; upon further scrutiny, however, they seem insane.More
  • Apparel

    032c “Dark Times” Brecht T-Shirt Black

    €50
    Buy Now
  • Société de 032c: GLOBAL PREDICTIONS from Cyber Oracle SITA ABELLAN

    “The major debate everyone is avoiding is how technology will modify our society and economy,” says the model, DJ, and self-proclaimed “techno princess” in a series of dystopian prophecies. “Technology is forging our behavior and will deeply affect who we become as human beings. Avoiding discussions about the use of technology without limitations and restraints will cause major injustices.”More
  • 032c WWB Collection

    032c WWB Turtleneck Camouflage

    €80
    Buy Now
  • Apparel

    032c Classics Logo Beanie

    €40
    Buy Now
  • Salty, Litigious, Iconoclastic: DAVID SIMON on TV as discourse

    With “The Wire,” DAVID SIMON accomplished the unlikely feat of captivating both West ­Baltimore bruisers and The New Yorker subscribers for an hour a week, over the course of six years. Twenty years into television’s latest “Golden Age,” as the creative blueprint pioneered by Simon and shows like The Sopranos unfurls into an endless stream of content from Amazon and Netflix, we revisit our 2011 interview with Simon from 032c Issue 20.More
  • OG? OK! Onitsuka Tiger Unveils 70th Anniversary OK Basketball Shoes in Berlin

    At their store on Alte Schönhauserstrasse in Berlin, Japanese footwear mainstays Onitsuka Tiger held a Japan-themed mini festival to herald the arrival of the OK Basketball MT and the OK Basketball Lo: two new shoes inspired by the groundbreaking design that ignited the Onitsuka Tiger brand almost 70 years ago.More
  • CROSS-DRESSING IN THE WEHRMACHT: Unseen Practices at the German Front

    While collecting amateur photography from periods during and after the war, Berlin-based visual artist Martin Dammann would, “from time to time,” stumble upon photographs of cross-dressing soldiers. Provoked, he began to seek out more, drawn to the “kaleidoscope of emotional states” that they revealed: “Desire for women. Desire for men. To be a woman. To be elsewhere. To be someone else.” More
  • THE BIG FLAT NOW: Power, Flatness, and Nowness in the Third Millennium

    As a contemporary metaphor, flatness describes how the invention of the Internet has restructured global society. At its origin, its promise was a social revolution founded on intersectional equality and universal democracy. It is our contention that that promise may yet be fully realized.More