NEIGHBORHOOD’s Shinsuke Takizawa Comes to Our Neighborhood

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Neighborhood’s designer Shinsuke Takizawa was recently in Berlin to introduce the Japanese techwear/streetwear brand’s newest collaboration with adidas, a brown leather Stan Smith. Neighborhood’s 2004 adidas Superstar has become one of the most sought after editions on the market. Will Takizawa’s Stan Smith do the same?

Neighborhood was founded in Tokyo in 1994 by Takizawa. Influenced by historical periods such as British punk and American motorcycle culture, it is also a brand rooted in the cultural energy of Tokyo’s Harajuku neighborhood in the early 1990s. “The name Neighborhood was inspired by all of us hanging out in Harajuku. Back then the areas of Omotesando and Aoyama were kinder to artists. Our common DIY culture brought together all these subcultural styles naturally, because that’s what we were surrounded with. I had only had to think about the present in that time. Today fashion for me is more about historicizing.”

Takizawa isn’t nostalgic though. “I don’t feel sentimental about the past,” he tells us. “I became interested in fashion because I wanted to work with my hands. My personal hobbies are what inspire me.” Takizawa, who runs both the business and design aspects of Neighborhood, also works with vintage motorcycles, running another company, Jurassic Paint, that customizes parts. “I understand the value of today’s technical innovation in design, and hope to combine this with long-lasting patterns and materials of the past.” One quote that can be found emblazoned on Takizawa’s work is: “If it dies, we become the same born.”

Neighborhood and adidas will release an edition of the Stan Smith tennis shoe designed by Takizawa for the model’s 50th anniversary, with a dark brown leather upper and classic Neighborhood graphics on the heel, tongue, and toe. The model drops in Berlin on February 1, and arrives in anticipation of Neighborhood’s fall apparel collection, which will combine military and Native American motifs with sportswear.

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www.adidas.com 
www.neighborhood.jp

 

 

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