KORAKRIT ARUNANONDCHAI – “Forest of My Dead Cells”

032c Workshop / Joerg Koch are pleased to present “Forest of My Dead Cells,” an exhibition by artist Korakrit Arunanondchai. Known for his denim paintings and videos such as the trilogy “Painting with History in a Room Full of People with Funny Names,” Arunanondchai’s work addresses epic, metaphysical themes through the connective tissue of the digital age—Levi’s jeans, consumer technology, and Top 40 hip hop.

For his exhibition at the 032c Vitrine, Arunanondchai cut off his dreadlocks and mailed them to a group of friends, family, and collaborators, asking them to create an artwork with each lock of hair. What follows is a group show created out of the artist’s dead cells.

“Dear Dead Cells,

I had you for years attached to my head. You collected memories, studio chemicals, sweat, cum, paint and dandruff while being bleached over and over again, tied into knots and finally turned into 41 dreadlocks. Then you were chopped off.

Here is a group of works by people close to my practice, who I have collaborated and worked with, who taught me and in some case birthed me and share the same genes as me.

Here are some dead cells, please breath some life into it, or something….

Sincerely,
Korakrit Arunanondchai”

Contributing artists:

Molly Lowe

Bradford Kessler

Michael Asiff

Spencer Sweeney

Adam Bailey

Dora Budor

Lizzie Owens

Calvin Marcus

Olivier Babin

Jon Kessler

Tomas Vu

Rirkrit Tiravanija

James English Leary

Oscar Murillo

Coco Young

Alex Gvojic

Rory Mulhere

Matt Taber

Ben Wolf Noam

Nicholas Repasy

Sebastian Black

Jack Eriksson

Vanessa Carlos

Boychild

Ed Fornieles

Ten Arunanondchai

Korapat Arunanondchai

Max Lee

Chutatip Arunanondchai

BANGKOK CITYCITY GALLERY / Op Sudasna

Sun Thapphawut Parinyapariwat

Praewa Chirapravati Na Ayudhya

Chut Janthachotibutr

Him Janthachotibutr

Dreammen BKK

Michael Potvin Nitemind

YEN TECH

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