JUERGEN TELLER: Men and Women

032c Workshop / Joerg Koch is pleased to present “Men and Women,” an exhibition of new works by photographer JUERGEN TELLER. Three series of portraits were selected for display in the space’s vitrine: two, shown here for the first time, deal with the masculine image, the coming into being and disappearance of a virility; a third, photographed in 2009, contrasts these portrayals with a feminine power. Teller’s five year-old son, Ed, poses as he lifts weights, runs on a treadmill and spins on a stationary bike at a hotel gym in the Maldives in late 2010.Next to Teller’s inheritor, we find his ostensible forebear: William Eggleston, pioneer of American color photography, now seventy-one. Photographed at his home in Memphis, also in 2010, Eggleston, too, gesticulates, balancing a drink in one hand as he plays “air piano” with the other. Between these two polar generations of male expression presides a serene Vivienne Westwood, portrayed in the nude as she reclines on a divan, timeless and smiling.

teaser_tellervitrine
Pictures by Boris Kralj

Born in Erlangen, Germany, in 1964, Juergen Teller has been living and working in London since 1986. Fiercely reluctant to separate his autobiographical, documentary work from his commercial fashion credits, he has exhibited at such venues as the Photographer’s Gallery in London, the Kunsthalle Wien and the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain in Paris, while cultivating longstanding relationships with designers Marc Jacobs, Vivienne Westwood, and Helmut Lang, among others. “Men and Women” is Teller’s first show at the 032c Workshop, and marks the inauguration of our “Vitrinen” series, dedicated to the showcasing of new or unpublished artworks.

Press Coverage:

New York Times T Magazine

Art in America

TAZ, 26.01.2011 – BRIGITTE WERNEBURG schaut sich in den Galerien von Berlin um
“… Vorn Plastic, im Hinterhof dann fantastic: Ich glaubte mich geradezu bei einer Gipfelbesteigung, als ich über Arno Brandlhubers Treppe den obersten Stock in der Brunnenstr. 9 erklomm. Dort stellt JUERGEN TELLER bei 032c in der berühmten Vitrine Fotos von seinem Sohn, von William Eggleston und von Vivienne Westwood aus. Westwood räkelt sich nackt auf einen mit weichen Kissen gefüllten Sofa und schaut dabei so vergnügt aus, dass man es einfach gesehen haben muss. Faszinierend ihre weisse Haut und knallorange Haupt- und Schamhaar, das so perfekt mit dem Orange der Kissen harmoniert…”

ZEIT Magazin, 17.2.2011 – Fabrice Paineau über die schüchterne Aura des Juergen Teller
“… Eine weitere Ausstellung findet in den Büros des Magazins 032c statt, das einige bislang unveröffentlichte Fotografien vorstellt, darunter Bilder, auf denen Ed zu sehen ist, Juergens Sohn.
Es ist oft schwierig eine Arbeit während einer Vernissage angemessen zu beurteilen, sich von all der glamourösen Auswirkung zu lösen , die einer vernünftigen Einschätzung im Wege steht. Aber eine der Fotografien von Ed, wie er während einer Reise mit seiner Familie ein Fitnesstudio im Hotel besucht und aus Spass die Geräte ausprobiert, hat einen unglaublich starken Eindruck bei mir hinterlassen. Dieses Foto ist gar nicht so weit vom Moment meines “Paineau-Elfmeters” entfernt: In der Haltung des völlig unbekümmerten Ed vollzieht sich eine kindliche Verwandlung. Körper, Augen, Haare, Seele scheinen sich in diesem einen Augenblick zu verändern, den Juergen festhält. Juergen liebt es, in seiner Fotografie Momente der Stärke oder der Schwäche zu fixieren. Momente, in denen sich der Körper sich selbst überlässt.”

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