It’s Getting Trippy: #THISISBOSS

HUGO BOSS is getting trippy. Since Jason Wu signed on as Creative Director of the brand’s womenswear line, BOSS, last year, the German house has been making impact with the relevantly bizarre. Leading up to Wu’s debut show for BOSS on Wednesday in New York, creative duo Inez & Vinoodh have directed a video, called #THISISBOSS, with a series of teasers, each released consecutively every two or three days over the past week. Starring Edie Campbell (see 032c’s story on Campbell in the V&A here) and shot at the Philip Johnson Glass House in Connecticut, it’s like a fragmented thriller, the fashion chopped and screwed into a range of vanishing points and suspense. #THISISBOSS

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