Issue #23 — Winter 2012/2013: Countryside

REM KOOLHAAS finally turns his attention from the metropolis to the COUNTRYSIDE, “an arena for genetic experimentation, industrialized nostalgia, new patterns of seasonal migration, digital informers, flex farming, and species homogenization” in this issue’s COVER DOSSIER.

Elsewhere SEAN + SENG sub-sahara JOAN SMALLS; LACATON VASSAL ethicize building; HEDI SLIMANE photographs rags to riches sculptor THOMAS HOUSEAGO; octogenarian NEW YORK REVIEW OF BOOKS publisher ROBERT SILVERS invigorates an industry while octogenarian INGE FELTRINELLI animates encounters with ERNEST HEMINGWAY, AXEL F. SPRINGER, and her leftist terrorist husband.
WOLFGANG TILLMANS hangs with PET SHOP BOYS’ Neil Tennant; ROE ETHRIDGE turns a rose-colored lens towards DE KOONING’s Long Island estate; LYDIA DAVIS tells us stories; LARA STONE gets BALMAIN’ed in leather; CORY ARCANGEL and PAUL CHAN explore new digital frontiers; TOPHEADZ glides over the surface of the Earth; ALASDAIR MCLELLAN does the VICTORIA & ALBERT;

032c’s latest SELECT presents the best of this season’s books, products, and ideas; we continue to tell readers WHAT WE BELIEVE, and so much more on 256 pages …

Contributors: Jodie Barnes, Julian Baumann, Kate Bellm, Beat Bolliger, Clang, Theo Cote, Lea Crespi, Frédéric Druot, Roe Ethridge, Peter Haffner, Tony Irvine, Rem Koolhaas / AMO (Janna Bystrykh, Stephan Petermann, James Westcott), Benjamin Lennox, Jonas Lindström, Joe McKenna, Alasdair McLellan, Sven Michaelsen, Michael Miller, Conroy Nachtigall, Mel Ottenberg, Max Pearmain, Ben Perdue, Cher Potter, Philippe Ruault, Karim Sadli, Sean and Seng, Emily Segal, Hedi Slimane, Juergen Teller, Cornelius Tittel

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Issue #23 — Winter 2012/2013: Countryside

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  • Life Exists: Theaster Gates’ Black Image Corporation

    Theaster Gates' “The Black Image Corporation” presents photographs from the holdings of Chicago’s Johnson Publishing Company, a sprawling archive that shaped “the aesthetic and cultural languages of contemporary African American identity.” Gates approached the project as a celebration and activation of the black image in Milan through photographs of women photographed by Moneta Sleet Jr. and Isaac Sutton – of black entrepreneurship and legacy-making. “Life exists” in the Johnson archive, he says, just as it exists and should be honored in other places of black creativity.More
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    Rising Mexican architect Frida Escobedo is relentlessly inquisitive, eschewing stylistic constants in favour of an overriding preoccupation with shifting dynamics. Personal curiosity is the driving force behind her practice, which makes he an outlier in a profession dominated by extroverted personalities keen on making bold assertions. "I think it really is a generational shift," Escobedo says. "The idea of the starchitect making grand gestures with huge commissions is over."More
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    Born in Berlin in 1931, editor and writer Fritz J. Raddatz relied on food delivered by African American GIs after the death of his parents. To Baldwin he was an “anti-Nazi German who has the scars to prove it.” Debating his return to the USA after 25 years, Baldwin explores the political climate in America at the end of the 1970s in a conversation at home in Saint-Paul-de-Vence.More
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    The Chicago-based artist talks to Victoria Camblin about materializing the past, the house as museum, and preserving black legacies. Social and artistic engagement, Gates suggests, may allow the contents and spirit of Baldwin’s home, and others like it, to settle in lived experience.More