Issue #22 — Winter 2011/2012: The Chermayeff Century

Introducing THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS of architecture and design: “Serge often roused himself from a serious conversation with, ‘Chris, let’s go get a sandwich.’ This was in fact a rallying cry for martinis,” recalls CHRISTOPHER ALEXANDER of his mentor SERGE CHERMAYEFF, the charismatic Russian tango-champion-turned-design-legend who began the creative dynasty featured in this issue’s 32-page cover dossier.

Meet IVAN CHERMAYEFF, the original Mad Man, PETER CHERMAYEFF, aquatic architect, and Berlin’s newest spark plug, SAM CHERMAYEFF, with essays, interviews and memories by CARSON CHAN, THOMAS DEMAND, MICHAEL ROCK, and HANS ULRICH OBRIST.

Elsewhere JUERGEN TELLER and IRINA KULIKOVA maraud in SYLVIE AUVRAY’s masks; CORNELIUS TITTEL resurrects the sex and successes of JIRI GEORG DOKOUPIL; New York’s preeminent avant-garde skate shop still reigns SUPREME (while remaining a mysterious church of cool); the 20th century’s best-dressed journalist, Hamburg media myth FRITZ J. RADDATZ gets canonized; CALVIN KLEIN… needs no superlatives, thanks especially to Men’s Creative Director ITALO ZUCCHELLI; man about town CLEMENS WEISSHAAR makes seven pronouncements on design, simulation and competition; ANA and DANKO STEINER pack some heat;

032c’s latest SELECT presents the best of this season’s books, products, and ideas; a special front section finally tells readers WHAT WE BELIEVE, and so much more on 260 pages …

Contributors: Christopher Alexander, Arno Brandlhuber, Thomas Demand, Georg Diez, Lukas Gansterer, Alex Hawgood, Oliver Helbig, Ben Perdue, Cher Potter, Michael Rock, Karim Sadli, Sean and Seng, Ana Steiner, Danko Steiner, Juergen Teller, Cornelius Tittel, Clemens Weisshaar, Italo Zucchelli

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Issue #22 — Winter 2011/2012: The Chermayeff Century

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Deeper

  • Life Exists: Theaster Gates’ Black Image Corporation

    Theaster Gates' “The Black Image Corporation” presents photographs from the holdings of Chicago’s Johnson Publishing Company, a sprawling archive that shaped “the aesthetic and cultural languages of contemporary African American identity.” Gates approached the project as a celebration and activation of the black image in Milan through photographs of women photographed by Moneta Sleet Jr. and Isaac Sutton – of black entrepreneurship and legacy-making. “Life exists” in the Johnson archive, he says, just as it exists and should be honored in other places of black creativity.More
  • FRIDA ESCOBEDO: The Era of the Starchitect is Over

    Rising Mexican architect Frida Escobedo is relentlessly inquisitive, eschewing stylistic constants in favour of an overriding preoccupation with shifting dynamics. Personal curiosity is the driving force behind her practice, which makes he an outlier in a profession dominated by extroverted personalities keen on making bold assertions. "I think it really is a generational shift," Escobedo says. "The idea of the starchitect making grand gestures with huge commissions is over."More
  • “I live a hope despite my knowing better”: James Baldwin in Conversation With Fritz J. Raddatz (1978)

    Born in Berlin in 1931, editor and writer Fritz J. Raddatz relied on food delivered by African American GIs after the death of his parents. To Baldwin he was an “anti-Nazi German who has the scars to prove it.” Debating his return to the USA after 25 years, Baldwin explores the political climate in America at the end of the 1970s in a conversation at home in Saint-Paul-de-Vence.More
  • House as Archive: James Baldwin’s Provençal Home

    For her new book, Magdalena J. Zaborowska visited the house Baldwin occupied from 1971 to 1987 “to expand his biography and explore the politics and poetics of blackness, queerness, and domesticity”. Here, she narrates her early journeys to Baldwin’s home and proposes a salve for its recent loss: a virtual presentation of Baldwin’s home and effects.More
  • Where are the real investments? Theaster Gates on James Baldwin

    The Chicago-based artist talks to Victoria Camblin about materializing the past, the house as museum, and preserving black legacies. Social and artistic engagement, Gates suggests, may allow the contents and spirit of Baldwin’s home, and others like it, to settle in lived experience.More