Issue #21 — Summer 2011: Scott Campbell

“I got my first tat in 1978. None of you were even born yet. You really missed out.” – NAN GOLDIN in a letter to SCOTT CAMPBELL, the young and famous tattoo artist featured in this issue’s 40-page cover dossier, complete with poetry from French modernist FRANCIS PICABIA and a little-known short story by SYLVIA PLATH.

Elsewhere AZZEDINE ALAÏA bares his love for animals and women; English artist HELEN MARTEN builds a page-specific installation; dream boys OLAFUR ELIASSON and KEVIN KELLY get techno-Utopian; AL-JAZEERA proves it’s the media outlet of the new millennium; LUCAS OSSENDRIJVER takes LANVIN to the frontiers of men’s wear design; FERNANDO ROMERO builds an art museum in Mexico for the world’s richest man;

DANKO and ANA STEINER go downtown with LEELEE SOBIESKI and Salem’s JOHN HOLLAND; Munich magazine magnate Dr. HUBERT BURDA talks tabloids and media theory while the king of arts publishing WALTHER KÖNIG takes us back to the first German art world boom; JUERGEN TELLER shoots KRISTEN McMENAMY in CARLO MOLLINO’s Turin estate (44 pages), testing the Mollino mantra, “Everything is permissible as long as it is fantastic”; New York’s DIS magazine invades our Global Briefings section;

032c’s latest SELECT presents the best of this season’s books, products, and ideas; and so much more on 276 pages …

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Issue #21 — Summer 2011: Scott Campbell

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  • New Arrivals

    Buffalo by 032c Jodhpur Ankle Boot Nude

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    Buffalo by 032c Over The Knee Boot

    €600
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  • 032c READY-TO-WEAR LAUNCH

    Last week in London we launched our first ready-to-wear collection at Browns East, including a BUFFALO LONDON BY 032c collaboration. Little Simz, Danny Lomas, and Sophia Hadjipanteli joined 032c apparel creative director Maria Koch, fashion director Marc Goehring, and sales director Nunguja Kisalya for pizza, drinks, and dancing. See our snaps below.More
  • On Power, Picasso, and American People: An Interview with FAITH RINGGOLD

    Half a century before the latest protests at the Whitney Museum of Art, Faith Ringgold was there, in front of the museum alongside other activists demanding equitable representation of women and black artists in the institution’s exhibitions. As a painter she was influenced, as the European modernists she studied in college were, by the masks she saw while traveling in Africa in the 1970s. But she would never wear a mask herself. More