MARIACARLA BOSCONO in “I do it exceptionally well. I do it so it feels like hell.”

For issue 34 of 032c, Roman supermodel Mariacarla Boscono explores latex vacuums and consensual suspension with photographer Thomas Lohr in the editorial “I do it exceptionally well, I do it so it feels like hell,” styled by 032c’s fashion director Marc Goehring.

Click below to see Mariacarla and performer Bianca O’Brien in the accompanying video, produced by Tender Night, Paris, along with the full editorial. And don’t forget to breathe.

To see the editorial in full, subscribe or pick up a copy of 032c Issue 34.

  • Photography
    Thomas Lohr
  • Fashion
    Marc Goehring
  • Model
    MARIACARLA BOSCONO
  • Set Designer
    MIGUEL BENTO
  • Hair
    RAMONA ESCHBACH
  • Make-Up
    Patrick Glatthaar using Charlotte Tilbury
  • Movement Director
    Pat Boguslawski
  • Performer
    Bianca O'Brien
  • Digital Operator
    Fabian Blaschke
  • Photo Assistants
    Olin Brannigan and Keir Laird
  • Fashion Assistant
    Louis Portejoie
  • Make-Up Assistant
    Anne Ebimbe
  • Set Assistants
    Amelia Stevens and Vuk Levkovic
  • Producer
    Ella Moore (Rosco Production)
  • Creative Film Producer
    Leyla Sassi Nicolas (Tender Nights Paris)
  • Production Coordinator
    Philippa Andren
  • Production Assistant
    Coral Cuthbertson
  • Special Thanks
    Lucy

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