“Heat Up Hadid” Hall of Fame

Our “Heat Up Hadid” Transfer Kit, originally included in the new Issue 32, is now available separately for those of you who want to Bella-fy your shirt, jeans, parasol, whatever. Taken from the cover story “Smith & Wesson Blues” by Collier Schorr, the photographer evolved Warhol’s iconic Double Elvis into a Triple Hadid.

The iron-on kit has been making appearances on all continents. What better reason to start the “Heat Up Hadid” Hall of Fame? Send us your pictures under the hashtag #heatuphadid or to [email protected] to be included and find us on Instagram under @032c.

 

For your convenience, follow the directions in this no-nonsense instructional video to safely iron all your fantasies into being. To purchase your own kit, click here.

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