GUCCI’s Bag for the Woman Who’s About Her Business

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Jackie Kennedy Onassis was so influential in modern fashion that we tend to forget how much simple dressing owes her. She took women out of tight waists and crinoline, put them in little black dresses and big sunglasses. Jackie O transformed the pill-box hat from military headgear into a Bob Dylan electric blues song, paved the way for tank tops with sleeveless button-downs, and converted the head scarf from a provincial peasant look into an alternative to a ponytail. For America’s most famous First Lady, knowing your family is your best accessory didn’t exclude you from also being a femme fatale.

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One of Jackie’s signature fashion items was her Gucci Hobo bag, an unlined leather classic that the Italian house’s creative director, Frida Giannini, has been reintroducing into its line since 2009. For the A/W 2014 collection, the “Jackie Soft” includes a tote, shoulder bag, clutch, and briefbag. It’s so versatile that anyone from Halle Berry in B*A*P*S to Angela Merkel could wear one. But don’t let the eloquent form and soft feel lead to assumptions of understated simplicity. Beneath the appearance of decorum lies the license for duplicity.

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