AMERICA

I see the boys lined up in PATRIK ERVELL, scheduled to bloom in the spring and end after summer’s heat. The models walk out from backstage in their individual reveries: eyes open, mind elsewhere. Watching them pass through a pathway of light, I think of Northern California. In San Francisco, a clear white light streams in as the sun rises; by mid-day, a fine fog gently mutes the landscape, marking time before nightfall. The subtle, transparent layers in Patrik Ervell’s menswear collection grow when hit by the light: the yellow oilcloth parka in thin cotton becomes translucent, the effect like spilling grease on paper. Classic American staples like denim jeans and are altered and dipped in pastel hues – as if accidentally washed in the laundry with a colored sock. The signature nylon windbreakers worn with unstructured suiting both protect and reflect, stepping away from the contrived, and into a feeling that is more romantic and austere. “I try to keep it pure and simple,” says Ervell, “to basic elements like color and light.” The effect, like Californian sunlight, is magical.

Photography by CLANG
Fashion by PATRIK ERVELL
Model ARTHUR [email protected] MODEL MANAGEMENT

Hair JEFF [email protected] WALL GROUP; studio FAST ASHLEYS STUDIO; post production YAU DIGITAL IMAGING;

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