Sarah Schönfeld’s ALL YOU CAN FEEL

Schoenfeld-CoverGerman artist SARAH SCHÖNFELD’s All You Can Feel is a visualization of legal and illegal drugs, now published in a leather-bound volume that functions as a psychedelic Rx field guide. To produce these images, Schönfeld – whose interest in chemicals developed while working at one of Berlin’s most notorious night clubs for many years – dilutes individual drugs in water or alcohol and, using a pipette, drops the solvent onto exposed negative film, which she then enlarges into prints. Although captured outside any body and unaltered by its corresponding semiochemicals and regulating substances – hormones or neurotransmitters – the images mimic the effects these drugs have on humans: they’re unpredictable, vivid, and complex. Unlike the coded labeling and neutralized packaging in pharmaceuticals today, Schönfeld’s project allows each substance to reveal its own particularities, falling somewhere between limits and acceleration, escapism and control, satiation and need, enhancement of life and longing for death. “What most people don’t understand immediately,” says Schönfeld, “is that it’s also meant to be funny.”

All You Can Feel is published by Kerber Verlag (Bielefeld/Berlin, 2013).

Deeper

  • New Arrivals

    Buffalo by 032c Jodhpur Ankle Boot Nude

    €450
    Buy Now
  • New Arrivals

    Buffalo by 032c Over The Knee Boot

    €600
    Buy Now
  • 032c READY-TO-WEAR LAUNCH

    Last week in London we launched our first ready-to-wear collection at Browns East, including a BUFFALO LONDON BY 032c collaboration. Little Simz, Danny Lomas, and Sophia Hadjipanteli joined 032c apparel creative director Maria Koch, fashion director Marc Goehring, and sales director Nunguja Kisalya for pizza, drinks, and dancing. See our snaps below.More
  • On Power, Picasso, and American People: An Interview with FAITH RINGGOLD

    Half a century before the latest protests at the Whitney Museum of Art, Faith Ringgold was there, in front of the museum alongside other activists demanding equitable representation of women and black artists in the institution’s exhibitions. As a painter she was influenced, as the European modernists she studied in college were, by the masks she saw while traveling in Africa in the 1970s. But she would never wear a mask herself. More