032c Workshop Report #1 (Moscow)

BAIBAKOV art projects is pleased to present the first installment of the “032c WORKSHOP Report” series, opening July 14, 2010. Bluntly titled “032c Workshop Report #1 (Moscow),” the exhibition features works by Yakov Chernikhov, Cyprien Gaillard, Konstantin Grcic, Carsten Höller, Missoni, Rick Owens, Gosha Rubchinskiy, Slavs and Tatars, and Andro Wekua.

Hip To Be Square, Slavs & Tatars, 2010

Though disparate in medium, the works on display share a core ethos: a concentrated effort to provoke the present by confronting the past.

Designs by late Russian architect YAKOV CHERNIKOVY make a bold statement of resistance to the Stalinist Classicism of his time, with a nostalgic return to Gothic forms in a Brutalist époque.

Contemporary artist CARSTEN HÖLLER has produced a tableware edition for the nearly three-centuries old Nymphenberg porcelain factory. Etched with the Constructivist imagery of Georgy Krutikov’s Flying City, Höller distorts the timeframe of an antique tradition with the Russian utopianism of the 1920s.

Designer RICK OWENS, as featured in the current issue of 032c, presents fabrics emblazoned with motifs from an East German monument—the source of inspiration for his A/W 2011 collection—branding his clothes with Real Socialist modernism.

SLAVS AND TATARS’ Friendship of Nations (study) takes on the Polish folk-baroque ornament known as a pajak (spider) installment in their latest installment of  79/89/09, a project for 032c examining the impact of the Iranian Revolution and Poland’s Solidarnosc movement on today’s political landscape.

CYPRIEN GAILLARD superimposes beer labels onto faded postcard landscapes, creating alternative city emblems, as ANDRO WEKUA stares down modernity across geographical borders.

Moscow designer GOSHA RUBCHINSKIY meanwhile imports the California skate-park sartorial dream into a Russian countryside that never existed.

These works are displayed on seven, 032c-edition Diana tables by KONSTANTIN GRCIC, coated in metallic car paints and positioned on a carpet of vibrant fabrics, made specifically for the exhibition by the Italian fashion house MISSONI.

The ” 032c Workshop Report” exhibition series articulates the ideas and positions that 032c engages with, both within the pages of the magazine and on site in the workshop, doubly as field research for future projects, collaborations, and interventions. The series takes place as site-specific satellite shows outside its Berlin base.

Below, you will find 032c’s articles on and interviews with the artists featured in the exhibition

Press Coverage: Dazed & Confused, Art in America, Look at me, Vogue Russia, Snob Magazine, Spletnik, New York Times’ The Moment.

Deeper

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