Ralf Schmerberg – “ AN INNOCENT MIND HAS NO FEAR”

Joerg Koch / 032C WORKSHOP are pleased to present an exhibition by RALF SCHMERBERG for the launch of the summer issue of 032c.

INT. CONFERENCE ROOM – DAY
 PRODUCER 1 and PRODUCER 2 sit across from each other at a gigantic conference table. They eat plates of quinoa salad.
PRODUCER 1
 This will be the ultimate Berlin film.
PRODUCER 2
 But how does it open?
PRODUCER 1
 A kid walks out of the alley of Berghain at dusk.
 His face is covered in tar.
PRODUCER 2
 Can it be a girl? Claire Danes?
PRODUCER 1
 No. This is the wrong direction. It has to be about nihilism. Life after our time.

In celebration of its 30th issue, 032c and artist-director RALF SCHMERBERG created a proposal for the ultimate Berlin film. It is a movie about a city now growing in population as it did one century ago at the beginning of the Weimar Era, after Russian refugees arrived from the October Revolution. It is a manifesto about life in the post-contemporary era. Cultural promiscuity has dissolved into a condition of spiritual bankruptcy. Heat and compression have melted the meaning from our past algorithms. This is the second death of God. Aimless citizens wander in search of a new morality. The bandwidth of pleasure-pain has become limitless.

“An Innocent Mind Has No Fear” brings to life scenes from the 78-page cover editorial of issue #30, shot in Berlin frozen to the core in mid-February. Filmed over 72 hours at 19 locations – including the Spree, Teufelsberg and Berlin’s most famous alleyway – the Marc Goehring styled editorial pays tribute to the city that birthed 032c. The trailer for the film is here, and on view as part of Ralf Schmerberg’s exhibition at the 032c Workshop, featuring photographs, production notes, screen takes, and objects from the shoot.

WHEN: Saturday, March 19th, 8pm to 11.30pm

WHERE: 032c Workshop, St. Agnes

032c_Issue_30_Schmerberg_Poster

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