˚360 by THOMAS SCHEIBITZ

Vitrine_low_res
032c Workshop / Joerg Koch is pleased to present ˚360 by THOMAS SCHEIBITZ, exhibiting his entire artistic vocabulary.

Scheibitz was born in Radeberg in 1968 and began painting and sculpting while studying at the Dresden Art Academy. Deploying several different media, Scheibitz places special emphasis on sourced material culled from the annals of 20th century Modernism, and harvested from the tricks and tropes of contemporary graphic novels to cut-out magazine spreads and, of course, print advertising. The result is a subtle visual familiarity that haunts his wholly original painted, sculpted, and drawn body of work. His recent solo exhibition, “ONE-Time Pad,” at Frankfurt am Main’s Museum für Moderne Kunst, was devoted solely to investigating the human figure, yet sought to recreate and to tease out new ways of visualizing the familiar form, using popular culture and historical design motifs for which the artist has become known.
Now extended in 032c Workshop’s vitrine, Scheibitz’ sharp lines, interlocking shapes, and penchant for the grid reveal the systematic manner in which the artist seeks to invigorate our relationship to classical compositions, symbols, and signs.

Photography by THOMAS SCHEIBITZ

032c Workshop / Joerg Koch is an exhibition space in Berlin. Featuring an eight-meter-long vitrine designed by Konstantin Grcic, its programming is dedicated to the idea and different formats of the archive.

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