ARC’TERYX LEAF and the Chilling Applications of Great Techwear

The Vancouver-based outdoor apparel brand produces some of the world’s best performance garments. Founded in 1991 by Dave Lane and Jeremy Guard as a mountaineer-gear brand, Arc’teryx takes its name from the archaeopteryx, an early (and extinct) bird that is the evolutionary species between feathered dinosaurs and modern birds. It is considered the best outdoor apparel brand around. “Arc’teryx products are the Hermès bags of men’s performance wear,” says Errolson Hugh, the chief designer of ACRONYM, a sporadic Arc’teryx collaborator and one of the pioneers of the field. “They embody a fanatic level of perfection. No other brand in the world even comes close to their quality.”

It is perhaps unsurprising then that Arc’teryx—which also created technically focused menswear line in 2003 with Conroy Nachtigall, called Veilance—produces a special line of “tactical” outdoor gear and apparel for law enforcement and armed forces, called Arc’teryx LEAF.  The company’s promotional video about the line borrows from the high camp of military propaganda. With grandiose hunter heroism, “Arc’teryx LEAF: From Conception to Realization” seems to parody the indoctrination media of government defence. It is fashion as gospel and performance as dogma—a theatrical portrayal of the best technical apparel around—and it might come across as tongue-in-cheek but it is actually severe and eerie.

www.acrteryx.com 

 

Deeper

  • New Arrivals

    Buffalo by 032c Over The Knee Boot

    €600
    Buy Now
  • 032c READY-TO-WEAR LAUNCH

    Last week in London we launched our first ready-to-wear collection at Browns East, including a BUFFALO LONDON BY 032c collaboration. Little Simz, Danny Lomas, and Sophia Hadjipanteli joined 032c apparel creative director Maria Koch, fashion director Marc Goehring, and sales director Nunguja Kisalya for pizza, drinks, and dancing. See our snaps below.More
  • On Power, Picasso, and American People: An Interview with FAITH RINGGOLD

    Half a century before the latest protests at the Whitney Museum of Art, Faith Ringgold was there, in front of the museum alongside other activists demanding equitable representation of women and black artists in the institution’s exhibitions. As a painter she was influenced, as the European modernists she studied in college were, by the masks she saw while traveling in Africa in the 1970s. But she would never wear a mask herself. More
  • CHILD’S PLAY

    Misshapen noses, frozen expressions and close-up shots of faded pink glitter create a grotesque ambiguity between animate and inanimate - as seen in this photoshoot conceived by Sasha Chaika, documenting Saint Petersburg’s bizarre Puppet Museum.More
  • UNPROFESSIONAL. INTIMATE. A LITTLE BIT LIKE A READYMADE.

    "Social media and society have something to do with the public square and having conversations and shared spaces. This project is a bit more running out into that space and shouting something out then running away. It's definitely a public statement, but there's no conversation really." Richard Turley and Lucas Mascatello on the possibility of intimacy in the New York-themed broadsheet CIVILIZATION. More