Issue #25 — Winter 2013/2014: Picasso

ISSUE HIGHLIGHTS:

Guest-edited by Cornelius Tittel of Die Welt, our cover dossier on PICASSO AND THE GERMANS IN 1913 takes us back to a European society on the verge of catastrophic change. It was the ground zero of modernism, and while Picasso was denounced as the “Cubist Bluff,” a small yet significant group of German-Jewish dealers embraced the painter who would go on to become the greatest artist of the century.

RIHANNA is the unfiltered and fiercely productive icon that every era needs and obsesses about. 032c invited Dutch photography duo Inez & Vinoodh to portray the pop star in a studio on Broome Street in Lower Manhattan for a 22-page fashion story.

A favorite among the avant-garde of the 1930s, Italian fashion designer Elsa SCHIAPARELLI closed her legendary house in 1954. This year Christian Lacroix was invited to design an haute couture collection to officially reinaugurate the label. 032c commissioned Juergen Teller and Kristen McMenamy to capture his tribute to Schiaparelli on a Greek island in the Aegean Sea.

How does NIKE avoid being a victim of its own success? The answer is HTM, a three-person design collaboration between CEO Mark Parker, designer Tinker Hatfield, and creative consultant Hiroshi Fujiwara. In “Nike: The Spirit Machine,” Jonathan Olivares and Gary Warnett tell the story of this core R&D team at the heart of the multibillion-dollar company.

TOMI UNGERER is the most famous children’s book author you’ve never heard of,” Phaidon Press stated on the occasion of republishing the Alsatian artist’s illustrated books from the 1950s–70s. Ungerer, who has made more than 150 books that range from children’s literature to erotica, has juxtaposed works from the past with new collages for 032c in a 22-page story.

The work of artist CYPRIEN GAILLARD navigates between architecture and nature, geography and psychological states. For 032c, Gaillard has created a sculpture edition. Modeled from a recent series of collages of images from National Geographic, it’s a tiny monument to the historic publication, which turns 125 this year.

Also featuring:

Brian Boylan @ Wolff Olins by Thomas Demand & Robi Rodriguez, Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele by Jeremy Lewis & Tim Walker, DIS, Matthew Evans, Hans Hollein by Robert Wiesenberger, Kacper Kasprzyk & Mel Ottenberg w/ Kati Nescher, Jeremy Liebman, Hans-Joachim Müller, Sir John Richardson by Cornelius Tittel & Jason Schmidt, Dieter Roelstraete, Michel Serres by Hans Ulrich Obrist & Manuel Cohen, Slavs & Tatars, Danko & Ana Steiner w/ Hilary Rhoda, Thomas Wagner

Magazine

Issue #25 — Winter 2013/2014: Picasso

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Deeper

  • Life Exists: Theaster Gates’ Black Image Corporation

    Theaster Gates' “The Black Image Corporation” presents photographs from the holdings of Chicago’s Johnson Publishing Company, a sprawling archive that shaped “the aesthetic and cultural languages of contemporary African American identity.” Gates approached the project as a celebration and activation of the black image in Milan through photographs of women photographed by Moneta Sleet Jr. and Isaac Sutton – of black entrepreneurship and legacy-making. “Life exists” in the Johnson archive, he says, just as it exists and should be honored in other places of black creativity.More
  • FRIDA ESCOBEDO: The Era of the Starchitect is Over

    Rising Mexican architect Frida Escobedo is relentlessly inquisitive, eschewing stylistic constants in favour of an overriding preoccupation with shifting dynamics. Personal curiosity is the driving force behind her practice, which makes he an outlier in a profession dominated by extroverted personalities keen on making bold assertions. "I think it really is a generational shift," Escobedo says. "The idea of the starchitect making grand gestures with huge commissions is over."More
  • “I live a hope despite my knowing better”: James Baldwin in Conversation With Fritz J. Raddatz (1978)

    Born in Berlin in 1931, editor and writer Fritz J. Raddatz relied on food delivered by African American GIs after the death of his parents. To Baldwin he was an “anti-Nazi German who has the scars to prove it.” Debating his return to the USA after 25 years, Baldwin explores the political climate in America at the end of the 1970s in a conversation at home in Saint-Paul-de-Vence.More
  • House as Archive: James Baldwin’s Provençal Home

    For her new book, Magdalena J. Zaborowska visited the house Baldwin occupied from 1971 to 1987 “to expand his biography and explore the politics and poetics of blackness, queerness, and domesticity”. Here, she narrates her early journeys to Baldwin’s home and proposes a salve for its recent loss: a virtual presentation of Baldwin’s home and effects.More
  • Where are the real investments? Theaster Gates on James Baldwin

    The Chicago-based artist talks to Victoria Camblin about materializing the past, the house as museum, and preserving black legacies. Social and artistic engagement, Gates suggests, may allow the contents and spirit of Baldwin’s home, and others like it, to settle in lived experience.More