Issue #21 — Summer 2011: Scott Campbell

“I got my first tat in 1978. None of you were even born yet. You really missed out.” – NAN GOLDIN in a letter to SCOTT CAMPBELL, the young and famous tattoo artist featured in this issue’s 40-page cover dossier, complete with poetry from French modernist FRANCIS PICABIA and a little-known short story by SYLVIA PLATH.

Elsewhere AZZEDINE ALAÏA bares his love for animals and women; English artist HELEN MARTEN builds a page-specific installation; dream boys OLAFUR ELIASSON and KEVIN KELLY get techno-Utopian; AL-JAZEERA proves it’s the media outlet of the new millennium; LUCAS OSSENDRIJVER takes LANVIN to the frontiers of men’s wear design; FERNANDO ROMERO builds an art museum in Mexico for the world’s richest man;

DANKO and ANA STEINER go downtown with LEELEE SOBIESKI and Salem’s JOHN HOLLAND; Munich magazine magnate Dr. HUBERT BURDA talks tabloids and media theory while the king of arts publishing WALTHER KÖNIG takes us back to the first German art world boom; JUERGEN TELLER shoots KRISTEN McMENAMY in CARLO MOLLINO’s Turin estate (44 pages), testing the Mollino mantra, “Everything is permissible as long as it is fantastic”; New York’s DIS magazine invades our Global Briefings section;

032c’s latest SELECT presents the best of this season’s books, products, and ideas; and so much more on 276 pages …

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Issue #21 — Summer 2011: Scott Campbell

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  • Life Exists: Theaster Gates’ Black Image Corporation

    Theaster Gates' “The Black Image Corporation” presents photographs from the holdings of Chicago’s Johnson Publishing Company, a sprawling archive that shaped “the aesthetic and cultural languages of contemporary African American identity.” Gates approached the project as a celebration and activation of the black image in Milan through photographs of women photographed by Moneta Sleet Jr. and Isaac Sutton – of black entrepreneurship and legacy-making. “Life exists” in the Johnson archive, he says, just as it exists and should be honored in other places of black creativity.More
  • FRIDA ESCOBEDO: The Era of the Starchitect is Over

    Rising Mexican architect Frida Escobedo is relentlessly inquisitive, eschewing stylistic constants in favour of an overriding preoccupation with shifting dynamics. Personal curiosity is the driving force behind her practice, which makes he an outlier in a profession dominated by extroverted personalities keen on making bold assertions. "I think it really is a generational shift," Escobedo says. "The idea of the starchitect making grand gestures with huge commissions is over."More
  • “I live a hope despite my knowing better”: James Baldwin in Conversation With Fritz J. Raddatz (1978)

    Born in Berlin in 1931, editor and writer Fritz J. Raddatz relied on food delivered by African American GIs after the death of his parents. To Baldwin he was an “anti-Nazi German who has the scars to prove it.” Debating his return to the USA after 25 years, Baldwin explores the political climate in America at the end of the 1970s in a conversation at home in Saint-Paul-de-Vence.More
  • House as Archive: James Baldwin’s Provençal Home

    For her new book, Magdalena J. Zaborowska visited the house Baldwin occupied from 1971 to 1987 “to expand his biography and explore the politics and poetics of blackness, queerness, and domesticity”. Here, she narrates her early journeys to Baldwin’s home and proposes a salve for its recent loss: a virtual presentation of Baldwin’s home and effects.More
  • Where are the real investments? Theaster Gates on James Baldwin

    The Chicago-based artist talks to Victoria Camblin about materializing the past, the house as museum, and preserving black legacies. Social and artistic engagement, Gates suggests, may allow the contents and spirit of Baldwin’s home, and others like it, to settle in lived experience.More
  • SECOND ACID WINTER: The Roots of Fashion’s Rave Revival

    References to late nights and chemically-induced collectivism are woven throughout recent fashion history with London's Sports Banger, Gucci, and adidas's Spezial unveiling acid-tinged collections and campaigns. It's not unusual for brands to mine the counterculture seeking inspiration, but the parallels between early 90s rave and the present are not purely aesthetic, but political too.More