Issue #11 — Summer 2006: Europe Endless: The Propaganda Campaign for an Old New Continent

We began work on this issue with a simple question in mind: why is there so much more euphoria for Europe at the periphery, in the new and aspiring EU member states, than in the center?  “From now on, the EU will be bold, explicit, popular,” states REM KOOLHAAS in our cover story on EUROPE ENDLESS. Foreign-policy thinker MARK LEONARD discusses how the European Union is as convincing an answer in the 20th century to globalization as it was to the problem of war in the 20th; AMO/OMA present a 28-page fold-out, graphic history of Europe since 1946;

writer NAVID KERMANI discovers the continent’s enthusiasm at its farthest edges; historian TONY JUDT tells how the West was an accident; writer KODWO ESHUN and photographer JUERGEN TELLER portray architect DAVID ADJAYE; artist collective SLAVS & TATARS redeem the East in Eastern Europe; artist / musician LINDER STERLING makes irony yield to the mythic again; artist MATTHEW BARNEY explores the sexual transmission between man and machine; writer DIETMAR DATH provokes the culture industry’s center with drastic arts;

art critic HARALD FRICKE on artist MARC BRANDENBURG’s dark power of signs; 1970s band THROBBING GRISTLE inaugurates both the beginning and end of pop; photographer TODD EBERLE exposes his Berlin diary;

the BERLIN REVIEW reflects on nine events, projects, and people from the last six months in the great cultural laboratory; and so much more on 192 pages …

Contributors: AMO/OMA, Jens Balzer, Jodie Barnes, Matthew Barney, Marc Brandenburg, Roger Deckker, Todd Eberle, Kodwo Eshun, Jason Evans, Eleanor Freiberger, Harald Fricke, Martin Germann, Akiko Hamaoka, Estelle Hanania, Oliver Helbig, David Hughes, Navid Kermani, Emily King, Andrian Kreye, Mark Leonard, Aram Lintzel, Niklas Maak, Michael Mann, Lucy McKenzie, Alasdair McLellan, Ingo Niermann, Peter Philips, Sebastian Preuss, Nancy Rhode, Peter Richter, Robi Rodriguez, Tasxmara Rothstein, Matt Saunders, Nigel Shafran, Payam Sharifi & Kasia Korczak, Hedi Slimane, Juergen Teller

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Issue #11 — Summer 2006: Europe Endless: The Propaganda Campaign for an Old New Continent

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  • Life Exists: Theaster Gates’ Black Image Corporation

    Theaster Gates' “The Black Image Corporation” presents photographs from the holdings of Chicago’s Johnson Publishing Company, a sprawling archive that shaped “the aesthetic and cultural languages of contemporary African American identity.” Gates approached the project as a celebration and activation of the black image in Milan through photographs of women photographed by Moneta Sleet Jr. and Isaac Sutton – of black entrepreneurship and legacy-making. “Life exists” in the Johnson archive, he says, just as it exists and should be honored in other places of black creativity.More
  • FRIDA ESCOBEDO: The Era of the Starchitect is Over

    Rising Mexican architect Frida Escobedo is relentlessly inquisitive, eschewing stylistic constants in favour of an overriding preoccupation with shifting dynamics. Personal curiosity is the driving force behind her practice, which makes he an outlier in a profession dominated by extroverted personalities keen on making bold assertions. "I think it really is a generational shift," Escobedo says. "The idea of the starchitect making grand gestures with huge commissions is over."More
  • “I live a hope despite my knowing better”: James Baldwin in Conversation With Fritz J. Raddatz (1978)

    Born in Berlin in 1931, editor and writer Fritz J. Raddatz relied on food delivered by African American GIs after the death of his parents. To Baldwin he was an “anti-Nazi German who has the scars to prove it.” Debating his return to the USA after 25 years, Baldwin explores the political climate in America at the end of the 1970s in a conversation at home in Saint-Paul-de-Vence.More
  • House as Archive: James Baldwin’s Provençal Home

    For her new book, Magdalena J. Zaborowska visited the house Baldwin occupied from 1971 to 1987 “to expand his biography and explore the politics and poetics of blackness, queerness, and domesticity”. Here, she narrates her early journeys to Baldwin’s home and proposes a salve for its recent loss: a virtual presentation of Baldwin’s home and effects.More
  • Where are the real investments? Theaster Gates on James Baldwin

    The Chicago-based artist talks to Victoria Camblin about materializing the past, the house as museum, and preserving black legacies. Social and artistic engagement, Gates suggests, may allow the contents and spirit of Baldwin’s home, and others like it, to settle in lived experience.More