The Montana Plains with Architect FRANK BARKOW

Architect FRANK BARKOW reads 032c after a contemplative horse trek on the Montana plains. 

Surrounded by rolling hay fields that unfurl into grassy foothills, architect Frank Barkow’s ranch is a sprawling testament to the mindset of Big Sky Country. “In summer, it smells like cut hay and in winter, it smells like dry, cold snow and chimney fires,” he muses about his retreat in Montana. The grounds hold a large timber barn and a ranch house, which, in true American fashion, have been remodeled countless times since the nineteenth century, displaying traces of dozens of different architectural styles. Yet, as Barkow points out, it is the land that really defines this place.

The Montana-born and Berlin-based architect makes sure to refuel at his ranch near Bozeman a few times every year. His practice, Barkow Leibinger, which he founded with his partner Regine Leibinger in 1993, has erected towers, pavilions, and apartment buildings in super-cities across the globe, while also embarking on publishing endeavors like Spielraum (2014) – a 20-year retrospective of the firm’s projects.

However, Montana is where the heart is. On a trip back home, Barkow casually leans on the wood panelling of his red barn, which houses horses Gerrie, Darby, and Jake (the Appaloosa). “It’s a chore to try to get them to sit still, much less try to read a magazine from the saddle,” he says.

The vast territory of the fourth largest US state leaves more than just room for prairie fantasies on horseback. It carves out a wild vacuum for the libertarian spirit. “There is a deep distrust of national government intervention in the state going back to the failed Homesteading Act. Most Montanans I know refused to vote for Trump or Hillary, opting for the Libertarian Party,” Barkow explains, “This is cow, wheat, oil, and coal country. There are a million inhabitants in a place that is bigger than Germany.”

In outlaw country, any reality is allowed to take form – whether it be groups formed out of civil resistance, or utopias dressed in the fashion of days gone by. It is a place where ranchers, conservationists, and anarcho-capitalists alike go to unwind: “Survivalists, cults, Mormons, Hutterites, Native Americans, fundamentalists, the Unabomber, and the ultra-rich all find space in this vast country to carve out a home they can call their own. There is no urban reality here, only how you situate yourself in a harsh and beautiful landscape.” Barkow then adds an important note for all potential visitors: “The Second Amendment of the US Constitution rules supreme.”

After a trip to Richard Neutra’s 1950s log cabin out on Sourdough Road, Barkow recommends Ted’s Montana Grill, owned by media baron Ted Turner, for the best buffalo burger in Montana.

Ted’s Montana Grill 105 W. Main Street Bozeman, Montana 59715

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Issue #32 — Summer 2017"US vs. THEM"

How do you find truth in an age without facts? The answer: wake up and stick together. In this issue’s dossier “US vs. THEM,” creative director RICHARD TURLEY explores how the Global Right Wing’s blatant disregard for reality has given us all a license to become Nonsense Warriors. Turning away from “them” and towards “us,” CATHERINE OPIE, NICOLAS GHESQUIÈRE, and STEFANO PILATI take us into their inner circles of friends, while COLLIER SCHORR turns BELLA HADID into Lisa Lyon. We revisit the work of MICHAEL SCHMIDT, and how his community workshops turned Berlin into a cauldron of contemporary photography. JACKIE NICKERSON shows us what Robert Longo looks like with a faster Internet connection, while CARSTEN HÖLLER takes us into his kitchen to explore the post-digital nature of food. We speak with VIRGIL ABLOH as he plots a fashion industry coup d’état and follow JASON DILL on a skate odyssey to hell and back to Fucking Awesome. And, last but not least, we make a pilgrimage to Santo Sospir, the villa on the Riviera where JEAN COCTEAU created his greatest Gesamtkunstwerk.

Also included with the issue, our “HEAT UP HADID” TRANSFER KIT which allows you to create your own t-shirt emblazoned with this issue’s BELLA HADID cover.

Learn more about the issue below:

Nothing makes sense. Nothing ever will again. The year 2016 marked a total rupture in the theater of politics. Even if the damaging effects of Donald Trump’s election somehow prove to be short-lived, his rise indicates a crisis wherein digital acceleration has led to political regression. In our dossier “US vs. THEM,” creative director RICHARD TURLEY creates a handbook for our new political paradigm. Its central hypothesis: Only within the chaos of this media overload will we discover what is real again.

“I am not sure if the sculptures were even subjects for her photographs …” For her first ever magazine editorial, “Heroines: Paris/Los Angeles,” artist CATHERINE OPIEteamed up with artistic director NICOLAS GHESQUIÈRE to create a study on the power of classicism and ambiguity. The exploration begins on the beige stone of the Louvre’s sculpture garden and continues to Opie’s studio in Los Angeles, documenting a sprawling circle of friends and acquaintances.

On a surrealist journey into the past, Martin Mosebach visits the summer retreat of JEAN COCTEAU. At the Villa Santo Sospir, the artist spent a decade’s worth of summers smoking opium and creating his largest total artwork.

Back with a vengeance for her third 032c cover story, COLLIER SCHORR teams up with fashion director Mel Ottenberg for “Smith & Wesson Blues,” a shoot with BELLA HADID, inspired by the body builder and Robert Mapplethorpe muse Lisa Lyon.

“Duchamp is my lawyer.” From his fortress of irony, designer VIRGIL ABLOH is set on turning fashion into the industrial arm of the art world. In conversation with 032c’s managing editor Thom Bettridge, he explains how streetwear is not just a fad, but a logic inspired by Dada and destined to dominate the digital age.

Accompanied by a re-print of MICHAEL SCHMIDT’s 2002 story for 032c, Kolja Reichert explores how the photographer’s community workshops from 1976 to 1986 create a style born out of the “Gray Island” of Berlin.

For the story “Energy Crisis,” photographer LUKAS WASSMANN and designer STEFANO PILATI shoot an editorial inside Michael Sailstorfer’s exhibition “Hitzefrei” at St. Agnes. As his first for a magazine editorial, Pilati’s styling includes garments from his own personal wardrobe.

“It’s an exhausting reality,” laughs JASON DILL. In an odyssey documented with drawings and pictures from his personal archive, the skate legend takes us to hell and back to Fucking Awesome.

In “Push Me Shove You Oh Yeah Says Who,” photographer JACKIE NICKERSON, along with fashion editor Marc Goehring and 032c apparel creative director Maria Koch, presents a yogic meditation on a white collar dystopia.

“I’m very bad at killing, in general.” As an antidote to postmodern culinary mediocrity, artist CARSTEN HÖLLER takes us to his concrete perch on the seaside of Ghana and guides us through the 11 points of his “Brutalist Kitchen Manifesto.”

In the “SSENSE Files,” we bring you scenes of cross-platform madness, including interviews with RICARDO BOFILL, PLAYBOI CARTI, CHITOSE ABE, CHRIS KRAUS, HENRY STAMBLER, AMINA BLUE, and 69.

In our second-ever “BERLIN REVIEW” section, we speak with JEFF KOONS about Plato, retrace MARTIN MARGIELA’s reign at Hermès, dive to the underwater tombs of PHARAOHS, and explore our favorite books of the season.

All this and more on 296 pages!